USA
(866) 476-5101
Canada
(888) 216-9184
spacer
Email:   Password:   Register
0 Items Total: 0.00
Support Center
 
 

Smoking hookah at home pollutes indoor air more than cigarettes

REUTERS/Susana Vera

People smoking hookah in their homes generate carbon monoxide, a toxic gas, and tiny pollution particles known as PM 2.5 at levels at least double those produced by cigarettes, according to a recent study in Dubai.

Even in the rooms adjacent to where people smoked hookah, air pollution levels were much higher than in rooms where cigarettes were actively smoked, researchers report in the journal Tobacco Control.

"There are widespread misconceptions that hookah is a safer alternative to cigarettes," said lead author Dr. Michael Weitzman, a professor at New York University School of Medicine.

"Smoking hookahs (water pipes) at home can be terribly dangerous for the smoker, but perhaps more importantly, for children and other people living in the home," Weitzman told Reuters Health by email.

During one hookah-smoking session, a smoker can inhale the equivalent of the smoke from 150 cigarettes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hookahs are among alternative tobacco products like chewing tobacco whose use has been on the rise in the U.S., especially among young people, the study authors note. Among high school students, 14 percent of girls and 15 percent of boys said they had used a hookah in 2014, as did one quarter of young adults in 2015.

To determine the effect smoking has on indoor environments, the study team collected air samples from 33 homes in Dubai: 11 where only hookah smoking occurred, 12 with only cigarette smoking and 10 with no smoking at all.

The study team sampled the air quality in the rooms where people smoked and in an adjacent room during about one hour of hookah or cigarette smoking, and compared the readings to nonsmoking homes.

The researchers used air filters to measure levels of carbon monoxide, black carbon and pollution particles 2.5 microns or smaller (PM 2.5), which can penetrate deep into the lungs and enter the bloodstream.

During sampling sessions, there were between one and four active hookah smokers, with an average of 1.7, and one to five active cigarette smokers, with an average of 2.3.

In rooms where hookahs were being smoked, carbon monoxide levels averaged 11 parts per million and the PM 2.5 level was 489 micrograms per cubic meter of air. In the adjacent room, carbon monoxide levels averaged 5.8 ppm and PM 2.5 pollution was 211 micrograms/m3.

In rooms with cigarette smoking, carbon monoxide averaged 2.3 ppm and PM 2.5 averaged 201 micrograms. Levels in the adjacent room were about half.

In nonsmoking homes, carbon monoxide levels averaged 1.5 ppm while PM 2.5 levels averaged 93 micrograms. Black carbon levels during active smoking were 5.4 micrograms/m3 with active hookah smoking, 4.2 with active cigarette smoking and 2.1 in nonsmoking homes.

There is no regulatory standard for black carbon levels, the authors write, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says being exposed to more than 9 ppm of carbon monoxide over an eight-hour period is unsafe and the World Health Organization limits PM 2.5 exposure in outdoor air to 35 micrograms/m3 over 24 hours.

"Hookah smoking has been increasing in the U.S. and worldwide for the past decade," said Thomas Eissenberg, a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University who studies tobacco use.

People are not as aware of the risks as they should be, and many mistakenly believe that passing smoke through water will reduce the health risks, he added.

"Even when the smoke has passed through water, which makes it cooler and easier to inhale, that smoke still contains many of the same carcinogens as cigarette smoke," Eissenberg said by email.

Eissenberg advised current hookah smokers to quit or to seek help with their habit. "If you are using a hookah at home, you are putting yourself and all members of your family at risk for tobacco-caused disease," he said.

Wietzman noted that pregnant women, people with heart and lung problems, and people with low iron levels are particularly at risk for poisoning from carbon monoxide.

"Hookah smoking, especially in the home, has the potential to be profoundly dangerous to the smoker, children, pregnant women, and all individuals who reside in or visit such homes," Weitzman said.

 

Read the entire article here.

Link: 
General Filters, Inc. Welcomes Trade Link Sales Midwest
Improve your indoor comfort
America’s Master Handyman®, Glenn Haege, has been involved in the home improvement industry for over thirty years as a retail store manager, trainer, corporate manager and broadcaster. He is a native of southeast Michigan and attended Northern Michigan University. Haege began making appearances on local television and radio stations as ACO’s Answer Man. In 1983, he was asked to host his own weekly program, the “Ask the Handyman Show, on CBS-Owned WXYT-AM – Detroit. The “Ask the Handyman Show” quickly became the station’s most popular and profitable show. For more home improvement advice, call “The Handyman Show With Glenn Haege” on WJR-AM (760) at (866) ASK GLENN, (866) 275-4536 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. “The Handyman Show” can also be heard on more than 135 radio stations nationwide.
Christmas for Cheyanna
Not safe within four walls: Delhi's indoor pollution is killing you
Though a majority of our anti-pollution strategy has remained focused on what is beyond the boundaries of our houses – vehicles, power plants, construction projects — there are several sources of pollution that pose danger to our health indoors too.
General Filters Gives Back This Thanksgiving
4 Signs Of Poor Indoor Air Quality To Watch For
China Faces More Air Pollution Deaths
An analysis by Michael Lelyveld 2016-07-18
General Filters, Inc. Welcomes Allan Feys
General Filters Welcomes Yvette Patrick
Using Whole House Dehumidifier to Protect Against the Dangers of Mold and Mildew
R.S. Hall is the owner of several successful businesses and the publisher of the website: Mold Removal Rescue.com, which provides solutions for mold problems.
Do You Want to Improve your Indoor Air Quality? Read This
From a new contributor to the General Filters, Inc. Blog: Dan McKee About the author: Dan McKee heads up the marketing efforts and provides digital marketing strategies to the marketing team at Service Champions, HVAC service providers in California. http://www.servicechampions.net
Indoor Air Quality - From the NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
Health effects from IAQ problems can range from minor to serious, depending on the type of problem. Health effects can include headaches, tiredness, dizziness, nausea, itchy nose, irritated eyes, and scratchy throat. The symptoms usually go away once a person leaves a room or building. Over the long term, poor indoor air quality has been linked to obesity, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, heart disease, and even cancer. Know the signs. Learn what you can do.
Why Should Indoor Air Be a Concern to Me?
And are there products that can help? How do I choose?
General Filters, Inc. Presents the 2015 Soaring Eagle Award to Mid Atlantic Sales
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  - All

Ask a Question:

* Indicates required questions
Submitting a Tech Support Ticket? For us to best assist you, please provide a thorough, detailed and accurate description of your experience. Tickets are answered Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm.
Name *
First Last
Email *
Phone # *
Are you a: *
Homeowner
Contractor
Wholesaler (Please list your business name below)
Other - Please specify:
Wholesaler customers, please provide your business name:
What is this regarding? (No sales solicitations please.) *
What do you need help with? *
VerificationCode
Enter code in image (not case sensitive):